Haonik

newsme:

Here are some conversation starters for this weekend, curated by me from around the web.

Obama’s Flunking Economy: The Real Cause,” by Ezra Klein.
What happened to the promise of Barack Obama’s presidency? Ezra Klein investigates.
New York Review of Books.
Nov. 24, 2011.

The End of Cheap…

Hijacking Ourselves

lareviewofbooks:

Like many in the literary world, LARB’s fiction editor Matthew Specktor was intrigued by the appearance, on Twitter and elsewhere online, of people claiming to be critics Michiko Kakutani and James Wood, followed by others claiming they were the real Kakutani or Wood, angry at having their identities usurped by imposters. The freedom to present multiple selves online has been analyzed since the beginnings of web-based socializing, but these literary pretenders, Specktor suggests, raise slightly different questions. The parody avatars and self-impersonations of the age of social media are not simply part of our unfolding future; they are redolent with the essential stuff of our literary past, of literary production and consumption itself, and windows into the process by which fictional people take up lodging in our heads.       — Tom Lutz


MATTHEW SPECKTOR

“I Versus I?”
“Defying a multitude of bizarre projections, or submitting to them, would seem to me at the heart of everyday living in America, with its ongoing demand to be something palpable and identifiable.”
– Philip Roth
All of us have been given a certain amount of time to waste. Some we fritter in the old-fashioned ways: by breathing, staring at dull panoramas, playing computer solitaire, or watching CSI. Most of it, however, we now waste on social networking sites: Facebook, Twitter, or whatever green alternatives spring up to offer a sop to our need to be seen, what used to be called loneliness. On Twitter, or Facebook, we serve ourselves up in miscellaneous detail, presenting our epigrams and aphorisms and photographs, our urbane or intemperate responses to others. (Hopefully not too intemperate. We are all politicians now.) Consciously or otherwise, we stretch ourselves into flattering (even if, at times, deliberately ugly) postures: We spend time trying to curate, to use that buzzy term, ourselves. Or “selves.” It’s hard to say which iteration deserves to be considered ironically these days, the one that takes fabulous vacations and lets the world in on its Spotify playlist or the other, the sad sack of skin that slumps in an ergonomic chair. Either way, almost everyone has both. It’s a rare holdout by now who won’t traffic in @ symbols and hashtags, who doesn’t consider all but the most self-embargoed information (I suppose “@____, I have herpes” is still an uncommon move) fodder for broadcast. Fair enough. I won’t get into the ethics, or aesthetics, of undersharing, but I will say that those fusty souls, fetishists of privacy or 20th century manners, who don’t feel a need to display their dinner plates to the world often find themselves hijacked — by @Abe_Vigoda, for instance, or @Wendi_Deng. Even those who thrive on electronic display are sometimes hijacked too: In addition to @kimkardashian, there exists @_kimkardashian (with 35,000 followers, to the other’s 12,000,000), @kimdashteam, @kimkardahian, @kimkardash … It’s no wonder, then, that we are often confused by impostors, delighted by sock puppets, and relieved — most of us, anyway — that we remain singular. Er, duplicate. Triplicate, if you count LinkedIn.

Read More

Picture a full-screen Facebook news feed filled with all the beautifully designed items that all your aesthetically inclined friends have purchased. Now clean up the user interface so there’s no spammy news ticker. Got it? Then you have arrived at Fab.com, the Web’s fastest growing flash sales site specializing in design.

votizen:

When you first created your Facebook account, there were a few things you had to tend to first. Your profile had a faded-grey silhouette that rendered based upon whether you told Facebook you were male or female. It was necessary to make it yours, add a photo, and share your ‘social face’…

bliptv:

Having loads of fun over at Pinterest and we’re looking for our friends.
Come find us!

bliptv:

Having loads of fun over at Pinterest and we’re looking for our friends.

Come find us!

untitledthemes:

The Falling Hearts script has been updated so it’s less buggy. I removed the jquery that was included in it, assuming you have it already installed in your theme (most themes do). If yours doesn’t, turn to Google.
If you are having troubles with scrolling, add the following to your Custom CSS in the Advanced menu in Customize:
body { overflow-y: scroll !important }
Install the latest Falling Hearts here.

untitledthemes:

The Falling Hearts script has been updated so it’s less buggy. I removed the jquery that was included in it, assuming you have it already installed in your theme (most themes do). If yours doesn’t, turn to Google.

If you are having troubles with scrolling, add the following to your Custom CSS in the Advanced menu in Customize:

body { overflow-y: scroll !important }

Install the latest Falling Hearts here.